ARC Imager

Overview

IMG boardTo support the Communication Mission Objective, the Imager was designed to take photos of Alaska. The imager utilizes a web camera that will take photos on command and store them to memory until the ground station commands the Imager to download the data. The main concept of operation occurs when the satellite reaches orbit and turns on and enter a low-power mode. The IMG subsystem has one main goal: take a photo using less that 100mAh of battery and upon command, transfer the photo back to the ground station. Once the imager has finished processing commands, the IMG subsystem will return to low-power mode

Operation

The imager system utilizes the same supporting hardware as every system on the satellite. The supporting hardware is the MSP430 microcontroller and a flash storage Micro SD card for memory. The main imager component is an Adafruit VC0706 camera. Upon integration the camera lens will be adjusted to focus on infinity, which will be as far as lens can go to retrieve a clear image. This will ensure the lens captures images that are very far away (like the earth). The resolution of this camera is very small. Each pixel from the camera represents 1000 km2. To log the photos successfully, the data for the images will be stored in the memory card. Each image will store the image number associated with the image data. Other details saved to memory will also be any errors that are logged over the systems lifetime and any other pectinate health data associated with the system. Each of the commands processed by the imager will come from the Ground Station or by other subsystems in the satellite. The Ground Station will command the imager board to take photos either at that moment or some specified time in the future. Other commands that the imager will have to answer to are health commands from the CDH board. The CDH will gather all health packets from each system and compile the data into one beacon packet for the satellite. The Imager packet consist of the state of the SD card, time of the next scheduled image, the number of the last image taken, and any flags that concern the Imager such as that there is at least one image in memory, there is a picture scheduled and a picture is currently being taken and saved to memory.